In September 1833, Charles Darwin set out for the four peaks of the Sierra de la Ventana alone, lured by local murmurs of caves and forests and veins of silver and gold. The small range was barely visible from the port of Bahia Blanca, a notch in the north-central Argentine coast. There, the H.M.S. Beagle remained docked with Captain Fitzroy, who had invited Darwin aboard the ship to circumnavigate the globe as a scientist.
Before I left for Chamonix to go hiking in the French Alps, I borrowed Solo Faces by James Salter from the lending library at work. My list of must-reads was long and only growing longer, but the ghostly mountain landscape of its cover caught my eye--a silhouetted man ascending a jagged peak.
Although rope technology has greatly improved in the twenty-some years since I started climbing, I was still skeptical when a lime-green Mammut 8.7mm Serenity rope showed up on my doorstep. The manufacturer states this rope is designed for single, double and twin configurations. Mammut also says the rope is designed to stretch 31 percent when arresting a fall. When used as a single, the Serenity is the thinnest-diameter cord in Mammut's line. 4 out of 5 stars
Alpinist.com Special Feature
Timed Just Right

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[Ryan Jennings was a prolific ice climber, husband and father, and contributor to Alpinist. "Timed Just Right" is a story he wrote for Alpinist.com six months before his death. To learn more about him, read In Memoriam: Ryan Jennings, posted December 31, 2015--Ed.]

A gentle breeze drifts over my bright-yellow bivy bag, tickling evergreen boughs just overhead. We doze beneath magnificent trees, poised at the foot of North Maroon Peak (14,014') thousands of feet above Aspen, Colorado. A pyramid of choss just beginning to shed its winter blanket of white looms over us and now seems in condition for an alpine ascent.

It's April 12, 2015. An understanding of timing mixed with a dash of patience leads to success in the alpine. What can seem impossible, unsafe, illogical or downright stupid can at times be the exact opposite if your timing is right. We're here today because we believe the moment is right to climb a new route. [Photo] Ryan Jennings

American Alpine Club | Access Fund | Mountain Project
The ACCESS FUND the national advocacy organization that keeps U.S. climbing areas open and conserves the climbing environment, representing over 2.3 million climbers nationwide in all forms of climbing: rock, ice, mountaineering, and bouldering. lorem
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