The Threshold Effect

Posted on: July 11, 2011


We're trying something new having guest columnists write features for Alpinist.com. If you're a fan of this new approach we'd love to hear your input. Use the 'Website' option to get your opinion to the right place. -Ed

Peter Beal is a long-time climber and writer, more of his internet musing can be read on his blog, Mountainsandwater.com. [Photo] Alan James

Alfred Mummery wrote in his 19th century classic book, My Climbs in the Alps and Caucasus, "It has frequently been noticed that all mountains appear doomed to pass through the three stages: An inaccessible peak - The most difficult ascent in the Alps - An easy day for a lady." While the misogynistic temper of this famous quote is obsolete, its more general point seems to ring true. Climbs get easier over time.

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Why does this happen and how does this happen? It's easy enough to understand how a climb might become easier for an individual climber on the second or third ascent. But consider the tendency for succeeding generations of climbers to find a previous generation's testpieces to be manageable, even trivial. Consider the remarkable story of Eldorado Canyon's Genesis. Originally graded A5, Genesis attracted the attention of Jim Collins, a young college student. Collins described in an article the almost superhuman training tactics he used to prepare himself for the ascent.In 1979, countless hours of physical effort and mental focus eventually resulted in success. According to Collins' own account, he even changed the dates in his calendar to reflect the year 1994 when he imagined Genesis would be regarded as trivial.

Yet by 1982, the route's second lead ascent by British climber Jerry Moffat was immediately followed up by his toproped ascent in running shoes and, by 1985, it was flashed by French climber Patrick Edlinger. Today Genesis garners the grade of 5.12d, a level reached by many young sport climbers in their first year. So what happened exactly? Looking at the relative strengths of Jim Collins and Jerry Moffat, it is hard to believe that physical capacity had that much to do with it. And given Collins's own solo of the Naked Edge in 1978 (before Genesis was freed,) it is unlikely that Jim was at much of a disadvantage psychologically. Differences in climbing gear between the two were relatively negligible.

It is fascinating to see how Collins in his own discussion of the preparation for the route, saw this pattern emerging. He wrote, in an essay called Hitting the Wall, "In studying climbing history, I noticed a pattern: climbs once considered "impossible" by one generation of climbers eventually became "not that hard" for climbers two generations later. 5.10 seemed nearly impossible to climbers in the early 1960s, but by the late 1970s, top climbers routinely on-sighted 5.10 as warm ups for harder projects." It appears that by the late 70s the cycle was beginning to speed up radically, beyond Collins' own predictions.

This didn't just happen in the relatively simple practice of sport or traditional rock climbing. In alpinism and Himalayan climbing, the rapidity with which the testpieces of yesteryear become the training arenas of the present has been accelerating in the past ten years. There is no question that better technology has played a part in this. But the sense that something transformational is occurring with the likes of Ueli Steck is hard to shake. Turning the once-epic and feared Eiger North Face into a kind of racetrack is just the beginning. When top performers such as Steck seem to be able to dismiss the limitations of the recent past so convincingly and completely, one has to wonder what sport climbing is becoming?

I wonder if the crucial difference can be found in what sociologists and epidemiologists describe as the threshold effect. Described by author Malcolm Gladwell in his book The Tipping Point, the threshold effect describes how ideas, practices, diseases and internet memes rapidly spread once they reach a critical mass.

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Comments
osprey46

pete maravich did things in basketball that no one had ever seen before, now I see school kids doing them! my first day on a rock was a 5.8/5.9 100' success. becouse I am a natural? no, becouse my climbing partner treated it as basic, and coached me through the rough spots. after that, I have never looked at a vertical face with fear or intimidation. big ones are awe inspiring, but I BELEIVE I can get it done. what we learn first we keep forever. set the bar high in the beginning, and we remove limitations. teach em young and show them the hard stuff!

2012-04-14 10:51:31
Wilkey T

Umm I've got to call Bullsh*t on Healyje. "Commercially driven hero worship" is nothing new. Messner was/is the king of commercialism, he owns what 3 castles?!?

2011-07-14 20:30:45
Healyje

"Older attitudes of elitism and arrogance towards outsiders helped limit progress across the climbing world by restricting access to information and creating the impression of superhuman ability on the part of top performers"

Have to bullsh*t on this comment and point out it's today's injection of commercially-driven hero-worship that creates the impression superhuman ability is required to climb well.

2011-07-14 03:06:11
butchy

The Threshold effect is most obvious in a sport like climbing but it is everywhere including the natural world. There are a lot of theories as to the origin of this well known effect and it may well be a fundamental aspect of the cosmos perhaps linked to the vary passage of time, dark matter Shrodingers cat and all that. The idea of a collective consciousness gives a tidy explanation for it and experiments testing this theory have had positive results but in the current state of cosmology, ideas of a collective consciousness are an article of faith. To me what is important is the influence of individuals and small groups to dramatically change the landscape and the stifling effect of elitism. Walter Bonatti was bared, by the climbing establishment, from attempting an alpine style climb of K2 back in the 30. Where would we be today if he had succeeded? Small groups can incubate innovation. If you are lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time you can change the game for everyone who comes after you.

2011-07-13 23:25:38
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