FIRST FREE ASCENT OF DIFFICULT JORASSES MIXED ROUTE

Posted on: October 24, 2007


The Gousseault route on the north face of the Grandes Jorasses with the line of first free ascent drawn in red. Famed, and recently deceased, mountaineer Rene Desmaison first attempted the line with Serge Gousseault in 1971. That attempt ended in tragedy, with Gousseault dead and Desmaison nearly there himself, and a bitter controversy over the conduct of the rescue ensued. He returned to finish the climb in 1973 with Giorgio Bertone and Michel Claret at a grade of VI 6a A1/A2, 1200m. The route has only seen six successful ascents since; the Scots' most recent ascent is the first to eliminate the aid for a new grade of VI 6c M5/M6. [Photo] Courtesy of Damian Benegas

The Scottish team of Guy Robertson and Pete Benson has made the first free ascent of the thirty-eight pitch "Gousseault" route on the north face of the Grandes Jorasses. Famed, and recently deceased, mountaineer Rene Desmaison first attempted the line with Serge Gousseault in 1971. That attempt ended in tragedy, with Gousseault dead and Desmaison nearly there himself, and a bitter controversy over the conduct of the rescue ensued. He returned to finish the climb in 1973 with Giorgio Bertone and Michel Claret at a grade of VI 6a A1/A2, 1200m. The route has only seen six successful ascents since; the Scots' most recent is the first to eliminate aid for a new grade of VI 6c M5/M6, 1200m.

After warming up on the Aiguille du Midi's route "Dame du Lac," the two Scots turned to their next objective. Though they had been considering an attempt on the line for several years, a five-day forecast of clear weather coupled with the recent death of Desmaison—which added "a distinct air of solemnity to the enterprise"—solidified their decision.

The tram closed for the season, the team tackled the approach on foot. After some questionably sound directions from the locals, the Scots endured a "sphincter-twitching," seven-and-a-half hour approach down the Geant Icefall. "Running cramponed across 40 degree hard ice slopes with a six day winter pack; dodging ten ton serac off-cuts" was a "nice start," as Robertson put it. An hour from the face, Benson inadvertently scheduled a rest day for the team with his waist-deep plunge into a pool of icy glacial melt-water. Two hours after leaving the Leschaux hut the next day, Robertson realized he had forgotten his headlamp and earplugs in the hut. "'All good acclimatization,' I repeatedly told myself as I ran back down the glacier."

Robertson and Benson worked up the route, finding excellent ice conditions, quality drytooling "and even a 'Gogarth-esque' E3 rock pitch high up on the headwall." Though the route has a reputation for a lack of ledges, the team found three adequate, lie-down bivy spots.

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"Despite a dropped leashless tool which was rapidly retrieved from it's sloping destination, we reached the top late in the afternoon of day four: not too bad for a pair of Scots weekenders."

The Gousseault route has two variations. One, pioneered by late French free climber Patrick Berhault, links the start of the nearby Linceul with the upper two thirds of the route. The Scots climbed the other variant, which begins farther right and shares the start of "Rolling Stone" (6a A2, 1100m, Kutil-Prochaska-Slechta-Svejda, 1979). This version probably was climbed first by Tobin Sorenson and Gordon Smith in 1976, then again by Francois Marsigny and Olivier Larios in 2003. Both Marsigny and Robertson suggest that the right variant is "the right way to approach the route, as is more logical." However, Stephane Benoist (who repeated the route in 2000) and Benoit Drouillat (who did it in 2006) judged the original route "engaged and complete."

The Scots agreed with Marsigny—the route's fifth ascensionist, who claims that the line is possibly the best mixed route in the alps—about the quality of the route. But they did report a significant amount of debris and abandoned material, in the form of rotten shreds of rope and some fixed protection, from previous ascents. It is suggested that this detritus likely was abandoned from either the first attempt of Desmaison and Gousseault or the second, successful Desmaison attempt, as the second ascensionists, Sorensen and Smith, apparently reported using some of the fixed gear during their 1976 ascent.

The route can be climbed clean, as Robertson and Benson reported using none of the fixed protection they found.

Sources: www.summitpost.com, www.scottishclimbs.com, Luca Signorelli.

As Robertson puts it, "...it just kept on giving...and giving...and giving some more." They report "beautiful, tenuous styrofoam ice; steep and strenuous dry-tooling; tricky snowed-up rock and even a 'Gogarth-esque' E3 rock pitch high up on the headwall." [Photo] Courtesy of Pete Benson

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Comments
castiella

Desmaison route to the Walker Spur, Grandes Jorasses: 3rd ascent by Mrozek and Splichal confirmed by Jorasses specialist Luca Signorelli (book of ascents at the Boccalatte hut).

2008-08-28 07:08:38
lucasignorelli

Hello Castiella,

that's really interesting, as my understanding was that Mrozek was on the Jorasses at the same time as Kutil & C., but not on the Gousseault. Could please get in touch with me at

lucasignorelli@alice.it

if you've more references/material on this?

2007-11-15 15:07:05
castiella

I would like to comment that in 1979 Boh Mrozek and J. Splichal climbed Desmaison route, from July 25th to 28th, more or less at the same time that their czech mates were opening rolling stones.I think that this third ascent is usually forgotten by french magazines but that merits to be known.

2007-11-14 15:18:32
svislaymist

FYI Tobin Sorenson and I did the first free ascent back in late October 1977 and we didn't use Desmaison's fixed stuff at all... we found plenty of ice and snow on the lower section, including a beautiful narrow ice gully about 1/4 of the way up reminiscent of Scotland at its best. We took a variation on the right and did not find any of Desmaison's fixed stuff until the top of that beautiful gully - where a rope came in from the left. That was pretty much all we saw. (NOTE: The right hand is definitely the most logical start to the route). We bivied a few pitches above this on a ledge to the right of the route proper just above a large roof which we turned on the right. A lot of mixed climbing up a series of ramps and a notable 'shark's fin' of granite sticking out of very hard blue water ice took us to the headwall. We bivied again on the headwall behind a flake of rock in a horrendous blizzard - Tobin used my padded overpants (courtesy Desmaison found on a broken footed retreat from a previous attempt with Black Nicky Colton) while I was wrapped up in a bivi tent (also courtesy of Mons. D). Tobin joined me in the bivi tent eventually and we sat there until it got sort of light. Then we went out for a wild Scottish day of howling snow and gale and gripping climbing ... Tobin led the crux headwall pitch (thank goodness) with 2 falls and much wailing about the need of a sky hook. He was brilliant! Note: we didn't have a sky hook for him to use ... he didn't even have a terror for 'dry hooking' - only a curved Chouinard axe - we had a pair of terrors for me and a chouinard axe and hammer for him and we both had bendy grivel 12 pointers. In fact all Tobin's gear was borrowed as his only ice climbing experience was the first ascent of the Smith-Sorenson ice groove on the West Face of the Plan a couple of day's earlier. I got rather nervous as our ropes were 2 x 200 foot 8MM laid ropes ... very thin looking!! I knew the descent from the Walker and Croz so we almost beat nightfall to the Italian hut ... There I found I had two frostbitten feet which were hard to hitch home to Blairgowrie with and Tobin went on to do the Eiger Direct with Dirty Alex (GRRRR - and they used those 8MM laid ropes of mine)... It was a great mixed route and very sustained with not a lot of resting spots and quite the feeling of seriousness (especially given the empty rucksack we found behind our bivi flake ...). The Smith-Sorenson ice groove was very nice and would have fitted in well on the Ben - it's just to the right (facing the cliff) of the Gabbarrou Picard-Deyme couloir and quite similar to that climb for difficulty.

2007-11-13 03:55:43
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