Enter the Alpinist Giveaway
In this Off Belay story from Alpinist 65, Joe Whittle shares a creation story that was told to him by a Nez Perce elder, Allen Pinkham. The story led Whittle to consider his relationship with nature more closely. He writes: "As I listened, I understood that recognizing the sovereignty of other elements in the world--including rocks, plants and water--can weave sustainability into a culture."
In this Climbing Life story from Alpinist 62 (2018), Amanda Padoan profiles Muhammad Ali of Sadpara, Pakistan, after he completed the first winter ascent of Nanga Parbat with Simone Moro (Italy) and Alex Txikon (Spain) in February 2016. Padoan writes: "Sponsorship never materialized for Ali, however, as it did for his European companions. He doesn't question why, not out loud. Back in Sadpara, he says he has too much to occupy him: wheat to thresh, potatoes to dig, cattle to feed, walls to mend, roofs to patch and children to educate."
Alpinist Digital Editor Derek Franz used to make fun of people who used rubber gloves to protect their hands while crack climbing, but now he's become a convert with the Ocun Crack Gloves. He likes that he can easily take them on or off, as opposed to wearing a pair of tape gloves all day, and no time or materials are wasted by making tape gloves that often expire after a day. Four Stars. 4 out of 5 stars
#alpinistcommunityproject Mike Libecki

Mike Libecki

From March 19-25, 2017, Mike Libecki shared some stories and photos with the #AlpinistCommunityProject about an expedition to Greenland in 2015 to climb a remote, unclimbed peak, which he'd named the Polar Bear Fang after finding it on maps and reconnoitering the approach by boat on different trips through the years. He had tried to reach the Fang--which he is certain is in a never-before visited area--on several occasions, but he had been shut down nearly every time because of sea ice, and once because there were too many polar bears to get off the boat. On this last attempt, he'd planned to go alone, but that quickly changed.

More from #alpinistcommunityproject
#alpinistcommunityproject Nina Glazunov-Neverov

From October 1-6, 2018, Nina Glazunov-Neverov shared some stories and photos with the #AlpinistCommunityProject about the life of her husband Sergey Glazunov, who reached a historic highpoint with Alexander Gukov on the North Ridge of Latok I (7145m) in Pakistan. During their descent, on July 25, Sergey Glazunov fell to his death. He was only 26 years old. Gukov was subsequently stranded for a week at 6200 meters before he was rescued by a dramatic helicopter operation, flown by Pakistani pilots Major Qazi Muhammad Mazhar-ud-Din, Major Abid Rafique, Lieutenant Colonel Muhammad Anjum Rafique and Major Fakhar-e-Abbas. Sergey Glazunov had often climbed with his brother Evgeniy. Glazunov-Neverov said she may take some time before she pursues serious mountaineering again. "I want to continue Sergey's hobby but I need to think about this," she said. Meanwhile, she said that Evgeniy wants to keep supporting young mountaineers in memory of his brother.

#alpinistcommunityproject Anna Piunova

From October 16-22, 2016, Anna Piunova shared some stories and photos with the #AlpinistCommunityProject about some of her travels while working as the editor for Mountain.RU. Piunova recently helped coordinate a dramatic helicopter rescue for Alexander Gukov, who was stranded for a week at 6200 meters on the North Ridge of Latok I in Pakistan after his partner Sergey Glazunov fell to his death while rappelling. Anna lives in Moscow, Russia, and has edited Mountain.RU, the premier climbing website for Russian-language speakers, since 1999.

 

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