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We're sharing this story early from the upcoming issue of Alpinist 72 because it pertains to policies that may change depending on the outcome of the presidential election on November 3. In this story from the Climbing Life section of Alpinist 72, Mauricio Portillo writes of how he arrived in the US when he was only four, as his parents sought a "safer place to raise a family," and how he and other "Dreamers" later benefited from the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy (DACA), which gave them a "temporary stay from being deported to countries we hardly remember." Portillo grew up to become a high school teacher and a mountaineer, finding a sense of belonging on summits in the Pacific Northwest. Then in 2017 the Trump administration attempted to rescind the DACA program. In June 2020 the Supreme Court blocked the immediate canceling of the program, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing an opinion that the administration hadn't followed the correct procedure. Since then, the administration has stopped accepting new applications to the program, has begun requiring current DACA recipients to apply to renew their protections from deportation annually instead of every two years and has delivered ambiguous messages about the overall fate of Dreamers. (In contrast, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden has promised, if elected, to "send a bill to Congress creating a clear roadmap to citizenship for Dreamers"). "There are approximately 800,000 Dreamers in the US today," Portillo writes, "and our future often feels more uncertain than an alpine climb."
In this Wired story from Alpinist 71--which is now available on some newsstands and in our online store--Dine climber Len Necefer journeys to the sacred peaks to find new ways to meld his ancestral cultural ceremonies and the mountain sports he loves while the world around him increasingly grapples with uncertainty and the threat of climate change.
As an IFMGA/AMGA guide, Mike Lewis spends a lot of time in the mountains in all conditions, rain, snow or shine, and he appreciates the value of quality eyewear, especially after LASIK surgery that left his eyes more sensitive to the elements. He's been using the Dragon Alliance Flash LL Ion Sunglasses that feature Dragon's Lumalens technology and eco-friendly manufacturing. Lewis points out that the big, flashy style of the shades might not be for everyone, but the quality is all there. Five stars. 5 out of 5 stars
#alpinistcommunityproject Mike Libecki

Mike Libecki

From March 19-25, 2017, Mike Libecki shared some stories and photos with the #AlpinistCommunityProject about an expedition to Greenland in 2015 to climb a remote, unclimbed peak, which he'd named the Polar Bear Fang after finding it on maps and reconnoitering the approach by boat on different trips through the years. He had tried to reach the Fang--which he is certain is in a never-before visited area--on several occasions, but he had been shut down nearly every time because of sea ice, and once because there were too many polar bears to get off the boat. On this last attempt, he'd planned to go alone, but that quickly changed.

More from #alpinistcommunityproject
#alpinistcommunityproject Nina Glazunov-Neverov

From October 1-6, 2018, Nina Glazunov-Neverov shared some stories and photos with the #AlpinistCommunityProject about the life of her husband Sergey Glazunov, who reached a historic highpoint with Alexander Gukov on the North Ridge of Latok I (7145m) in Pakistan. During their descent, on July 25, Sergey Glazunov fell to his death. He was only 26 years old. Gukov was subsequently stranded for a week at 6200 meters before he was rescued by a dramatic helicopter operation, flown by Pakistani pilots Major Qazi Muhammad Mazhar-ud-Din, Major Abid Rafique, Lieutenant Colonel Muhammad Anjum Rafique and Major Fakhar-e-Abbas. Sergey Glazunov had often climbed with his brother Evgeniy. Glazunov-Neverov said she may take some time before she pursues serious mountaineering again. "I want to continue Sergey's hobby but I need to think about this," she said. Meanwhile, she said that Evgeniy wants to keep supporting young mountaineers in memory of his brother.

#alpinistcommunityproject Anna Piunova

From October 16-22, 2016, Anna Piunova shared some stories and photos with the #AlpinistCommunityProject about some of her travels while working as the editor for Mountain.RU. Piunova recently helped coordinate a dramatic helicopter rescue for Alexander Gukov, who was stranded for a week at 6200 meters on the North Ridge of Latok I in Pakistan after his partner Sergey Glazunov fell to his death while rappelling. Anna lives in Moscow, Russia, and has edited Mountain.RU, the premier climbing website for Russian-language speakers, since 1999.

 

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